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Is Ring Ease a Scam

Ring Ease – Scam or Real Cure for Tinnitus? [Truth Exposed]

Ring Ease is supposedly some miracle cure for tinnitus… Or at least that is what they lead you to believe. But is it really all that great? Can this 100% natural supplement really "quickly and permanently" cure your tinnitus like you are told? Or is it possible that Ring Ease is a scam that is just going to be a waste of your money?

It is no secret that there are a lot of scam health products out there, many that are claimed to be cures for tinnitus. In fact, I have reviewed several other tinnitus scams on this very website, Tinnitus 911 and Tonaki Tinnitus Protocol being two that come to mind.

It is completely logical that you are suspicious of Ring Ease. Any supplement like this that claims to be a "cure all" and will work for anyone is a major red flag. How can one supplement cure tinnitus for everyone if there are multiple causes of tinnitus? It just makes no sense and I knew after coming across this product that I had to do a little investigating and write a review.

In this review I'll be going over all you need to know before hand. If you were thinking about possibly purchasing this supplement, you are definitely going to want to read over my review beforehand.

Ring Ease Review

Name: Ring Ease

Manufacturer: Life Now Naturals

Type: Tinnitus treatment

Price: Varies

Recommended?: Absolutely NOT

Ring Ease

What Is Ring Ease?

Okay... Well you probably already know what is, but for those of you reading this who might not be completely aware, what is Ring Ease exactly?... Or maybe I should say what is Ring Ease claimed to be?


Ring Ease is a 100% natural supplement that is said to cure tinnitus for anyone who suffers from it. Furthermore, it is promoted as a way to "quickly and permanently" cure tinnitus, which is one heck of a claim to make.


Now what exactly is tinnitus? Tinnitus is a term used to describe constant or at least semi-constant ringing or buzzing in the years. Basically it is the perception of sound without there actually being any auditory sound going into the ears. It is your ears playing tricks on you and is actually extremely common.


From the research I have done I have found that one in five people have tinnitus, although in most cases it is not all that bad. I myself have tinnitus, but it certainly isn't to the extent that some people have it where it keeps them up at night.


According to MayoClinic it is often caused by age-related hearing loss and loud noise exposure, but it cannot be caused by a number of different things, even medications. In fact, I even found a study that has found a relationship between people's emotional conditions and tinnitus (stress).


But anyways… The bottom line is that tinnitus can be caused by number of different things and that Ring Ease claims to be a cure no matter what. If this is true then this product really is a miracle. Tinnitus can be an absolutely horrible in life changing condition that some people go for years of suffering from without ever finding a cure.


But does it really work and should you buy it? Well… I'll get into this in a second, but first let's go over the sales pitch.

The Sales Pitch

Maybe you watched the video presentation, maybe you didn't. If you did then this ridiculous sales pitch is probably what led you to be suspicious of the product and ultimately look into whether or not it is a scam.


The video is presented as a "short but controversial video" with David Smith being the spokesperson. Apparently this David Smith guy's father almost burned to death in his sleep due to tinnitus, but of course now he has perfect hearing without any surgery… All thanks to Ring Ease.


The Ring Ease supplement supposedly comes from Psalm "1700-year-old trick" discovered by Buddhist monks.


David Smith claims that his old doctor friend, Dr. Mathers, new some monks that drink a tea which helps with their hearing… And of course this is some natural miracle hearing treatment. In the video presentation he hints that it is all about this ingredient called "citrus maxima", which I found has a more common name of Pomelo.


He tells you that is all about the bioflavonoids that are found in citrus maxima, which are powerful antioxidants that fight inflammation. 


In addition, ginko biloba, Thai garlic, and magnesium are other special ingredients that are supposedly powerful treatments for tinnitus.


David claims that inflammation is the root cause of tinnitus and other forms of hearing loss. He tells you that all stems from the inflammation of the cochlear nerve and of course all of these exotic ingredients are natural cures/treatments for such inflammation.

Some Red Flags

#1 - Sounds a Bit Too Good To Be True

I think that it is pretty obvious that this all sounds a bit too good to be true. I mean just think about it… This guy's dad almost died in a fire, he goes out on a mission to find a cure and comes across this 100% natural cure that is some ancient secret… And of course it can "quickly and permanently" cure tinnitus.

#2 - Some Ancient "Secret"

I've reviewed quite a bit of health scams in it seems that many of them are promoted as ancient secrets that have since been rediscovered and are now being opened up to the public.


I guess the reason for a sales pitch like this is because it is more intriguing and luring. Who wouldn't want to learn about some ancient hidden secret that has since been uncovered? I sure would.

#3 - Hearing Industry Criticism

Another red flag is all of the criticism of the hearing industry. Throughout the video presentation David calls their latest hearing technology a "gimmick" and says that they don't actually want to help cure your hearing… They just want to keep you hooked on their latest medications/products and profit from you.


Now while this may be true to some extent, and I think most people have some distrust for the medical industry, he takes things a bit too far and makes it seem as if everyone involved in the industry is out to get you. He takes a ridiculous approach to things and is doing so to scare you into purchasing his 100% natural cure-all product… Ring Ease.

#4 - Presentation Might Get Shut Down

Of course the video presentation might get shut down at any second. He tells you that the hearing device industry along with the pharmaceutical industry hate this presentation and are out to shut it down. This is pretty much the same sales pitch I've heard from numerous other scams I have reviewed, including Tonaki Tinnitus Protocol that I mentioned earlier along with others such as Diabetes Destroyer.

#5 - Lacking Proof of Claims 

At one point in the video presentation he claims that this natural supplement has helped secure over 21,000 people all over the world. However… If this is true why is there no proof of this ever happening? And why isn't this receiving more popularity?


I get it, I get it… The medical establishment is trying to shut this operation down and keep it hidden. But seriously… If there really were 21,000 people who were cured from this then you would think there'd be a lot more talk about it all over social media.

#6 - "David Smith"

David Smith, who is supposedly the person behind this all, claims to have a PhD in botany from the University of Idaho, a dad who almost died from tinnitus during a fire, and claims to have the most effective treatment for tinnitus on the market.


But who is this guy really? Unfortunately, I have no idea and there is a good chance he is a completely made up character. There is no verifiable information given on this guy during the video presentation so there's really not all that much I can say here.


All I know is that his story sounds a little bit too good to be true and I have come across many scam products that are promoted under fake, fictitious names.

#7 - Exaggerated Benefits

Throughout the sales pitch he mentions all sorts of studies in talks about how the ingredients he came across have been "statistically significant", but this is a bit misleading. What he doesn't tell you is that being "statistically significant" during a scientific study is much different from what ordinary people would call statistically significant. Basically what I am saying is that being statistically significant and clinically significant are two different things.


Some ingredient may be shown to be statistically significant during a lab study, but this doesn't necessarily mean it will translate into statistically significant results when it comes to human treatment.

#8 - The Company that Manufactures It

The last red flag want to mention is the company that manufactures this product, which is Life Now Naturals. More about this company in a bit, but what you should know now is that there is very little information on this company at all… Which is definitely very worrisome.

Are These Ingredients Really That Special?

The truth is that ginko biloba, citrus maxima, Thai garlic, etc. are not nearly as special in amazing as you are led to believe. What's going on here is the creators of this supplement have taken exotic ingredients that not many people know about, nor have in their diets, and put them in this supplement to make you think that you are missing out on something amazing.


That said, these ingredients are "proven" to work to some extent.


What Science Says


Some of what the spokesperson tells you is true to some extent, he just presents things in a very misleading way.


For example, ginko biloba has been shown to produce "statistically significant" results that were superior to a placebo when tested on groups suffering from cerebrovascular insufficiency, which inflammation has been shown to play a role in.


Inflammation is the cause of many diseases/conditions, or at the very least play some part in them, including asthma, arthritis, sinusitis, etc. However, there is very little information linking inflammation to tinnitus in the information that is out there is lacking.


For example, I actually found one study that seems to say that inflammation is good for tinnitus, which is very strange. The reason is because inflammation produces prostaglandins which have been shown to be helpful. In one study, 8 out of 24 patients receiving a synthetic prostaglandin medication showed improvement in tinnitus while the placebo group did not.


But there is definitely a lack of studies in this area and most of what I have found shows that inflammation worsens tinnitus, as you will hear from many people experiencing this condition. Even on arthritis.org they talk about how anti-inflammatory foods are good and even mention Thai garlic as being such, as well as a powerful antioxidant.


When it comes to ginko biloba, I found a pretty interesting double-blind study (link here) of people with tinnitus. In this study 360 people were given 50 mg of ginko extract three times daily for 12 weeks and another 360 people were given a placebo. At the end of the study 34 pull from the group taking the extract said their tinnitus had reduced while 35 people taking the placebo said it reduced… Which means there was no real effect in this particular study. Both groups were claiming their tinnitus was reduced.


I have read that ginko biloba can decrease tinnitus severity when it is the result of cerebral insufficiency, but of course this all depends on the cause of tinnitus… Meaning that it definitely is not a "cure all".


And as far as "citrus maxima" goes, a.k.a. pomelo, there really isn't anything worth mentioning.


What you should take away from this section is that, while some of these ingredients do have the potential to benefit and/or treat tinnitus to some extent, they are not nearly as effective as their claimed to be. The promotional material for Ring Ease it is extremely misleading and only the information that supports the case of this being a "cure all" is given. 

Side Effects to Worry About?

There aren't any side effects that really need to be worried about, although you should always consult with a doctor before taking any sort of supplement like this.


The ingredients are all natural and basically all this supplement does is aids your body as an antioxidant. It is not a drug that is going to produce extreme results in any manner.

The Bottom Line: Does Ring Ease Work?

So does Ring Ease work? Is it worth purchasing?


Well.... This all depends on your particular situation. It all depends on what exactly is causing your tinnitus and the severity of your tinnitus. For many people out there this supplement is going to have little to no effect, unfortunately. That said, it does have the potential to produce positive results for some people, although I would not count on it.

The Company Behind It

Earlier I mentioned that the company behind this supplement was a red flag and now I'm going to go into more detail on this.


The company that manufactures Ring Ease is known as Life Now Naturals, or at least that is what it states on the bottle. The official website for this company can be found at getlifenownaturals.com. This is the only website I can find associated with this company, although there is not much information out there.


On the website it states that the real name behind this company is:


New Life Organics LLC

30 N Gould Street, Suite R

Sheridan, WY 82801, United States


And the return address shown is:

3420 Cavalier Trail, STE E, Cuyohoga Falls,

Oh 44224


The reason I am talking about the return address is because there is another company called Nutrify Health that shares the same return address… And this other company also has little to no information about them.


Thing else worth mentioning is that the About Us page on the official website provides one small paragraph of information that tells you just about nothing at all. It just says that they are a company that is made up of professionals that make natural health products… That is it. That is all we know about this company. And as far as I see they only make two products… Ring Ease and a Turmeric Circumin supplement


So can you really trust this place at all? I mean, I don't know about you, but when it comes to supplements like this that you have to ingest I would like to be a little more confident in the company behind it all. There are a lot of supplement scams out there and when you don't have a third party like the FDA looking over everything you have to be extra careful.

Beware of Fake Reviews

Upon doing my research I came across a number of reviews out there for Ring Ease talking about how great this product is and why you should buy it. However, these are all fake and all the people writing these reviews are just promoting the product to try to make money. This is not unusual at all, and no better how bad the product is you will always find good reviews out there from people trying to make money.


In fact, I can't find a single review out there that seems to be legitimate. Not a single review that seems to come from someone who has actually tried this supplement out. All of them that I have found appear to be quite obviously fake.

Conclusion - Scam or Not?

I don't think I will be so harsh as to call this a complete scam, but I would definitely say that there is a lot of "scammy" activity going on. Ring Ease is a great example of another health product that is promoted in a very deceptive and misleading way. It is promoted as a "cure all" that can  "quickly and permanently" cure your tinnitus but there is no proof of this being the case and based on the ingredient profile, it doesn't make any sense that this would be true.


While Ring Ease does possess the potential to have positive effects on tinnitus, it is definitely not a product that I'm going to be recommending and I certainly do not think it is worth the price. Unfortunately this is just another over-hyped product that doesn't live up to the claims made.



I hope you enjoyed my honest review here and found it helpful. Please share this review to help spread the truth before others buy into this scammy supplement after being lured in with misleading information.


Also, leave any comments or questions below and I'll get back to you as soon as I can 🙂


About the Author Kyle

Kyle is an avid health enthusiast that believes in nature as a cure-all. When he's not drinking spirulina smoothies or dealing with the horrible aftertaste of stevia, he is probably working out, researching healthy herbs, or dealing with hand cramps he gets from writing articles like this.

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